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Application of Hot Melt Extrusion Technology in the Development of Abuse-Deterrent Formulations: An Overview

Author(s):

Arun Butreddy, Dinesh Nyavanandi, Sagar Narala, Fischer Austin and Suresh Bandari*   Pages 1 - 15 ( 15 )

Abstract:


The misuse, abuse, and illicit use of prescription opioid analgesics is a global public health concern. However, there are many viable therapeutic options for the treatment of patients with chronic pain. Both intact and manipulated opioid drug products are abused by various routes such as oral, nasal, and injection which may lead to overdose, drug addiction, and even death. To combat the abuse of these medications, regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies are switching their interest towards developing Abuse deterrent formulations (ADFs), with the intent to deter the abuse of opioid products to a maximum extent. Thereare several manufacturing strategies implemented in an attempt to develop ADFs. An example include matrix tablets of high molecular weight polymers such as polyethylene oxide. The scalable and continuous manufacturing techniques, such as hot melt extrusion (HME), is increasingly accepted by pharmaceutical companies to advance the development and manufacturing of ADFs. The application of the HME technique in the development of ADFs may overcome the challenges of opioid analgesic formulation development and provide improved protection against misuse and abuse, while also ensuring access to safe and effective use in patients with chronic pain. This review deals with a brief overview of strategies, with emphasis on HME to deter opioid abuse, in vitrocharacterization methods, commonly used excipients in the development of ADFs, and regulatory standards to meet the requirements of ADFs.

Keywords:

Hot melt extrusion, Abuse, Opioids, Manipulation, Abuse deterrent formulations, Polymer.

Affiliation:

Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677, Department of Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery, School of Pharmacy, The University of Mississippi, University, MS 38677



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